Healthcare

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Rhode Island Numbers

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Healthcare

About

Rhode Island Numbers

Information for

Programs

Publications

Regulations

Partners

Healthcare Access

Purpose

To measure access to healthcare among adults 18 years and older.

Key Information

Percentage of adults who are uninsured, have no doctor, experience cost barriers to seeing a doctor, and have not had a recent checkup (lower values are preferred on all measures)

  • Uninsured: Respondent has no health care coverage, including health insurance, prepaid plans such as HMO's; government plans such as Medicare, or Indian Health Service.
  • No doctor: Respondent has no one person as a personal doctor or health care provider.
  • Can't afford: Respondent needed to see a doctor but could not because of cost, in past 12 months.
  • No checkup: Respondent had no routine checkup in past 12 months. This does not include exams conducted for a specific injury, illness, or condition.

Rhode Island Numbers 2015

Rhode Island compared to United States

  • The percentages of Rhode Island adults who are uninsured, have no doctor, experience cost barriers to seeing a doctor, and have not had a checkup in the past 12 months are lower than the US adult population.

By Gender

  • Men are significantly more likely to be uninsured, have no doctor, and not have had a checkup in the past 12 months compared with women.

By Age

  • Younger adults are more likely to be uninsured, have no doctor, experience cost barriers to seeing a doctor, and not have had a checkup in the past 12 months compared with older adults.

By Race / Ethnicity

  • White, non-Hispanic adults have fewer barriers to access healthcare than other racial/ethnic groups.
  • The prevalence of being uninsured, having no doctor, experiencing cost barriers to seeing a doctor, and having had no checkup in the past 12 months are highest among Hispanic adults compared with all other racial/ethnic groups.

By Health Status

  • Adults reporting “fair or poor” health are more likely to be uninsured, have no doctor, and experience cost barriers to seeing a doctor compared with their peers of “good or better” health.

By Smoking Status